Meet Lucas Mangum

Ghouls and Gals,

Let me introduce you to your new favorite Horror author Lucas Mangum.

I first met Lucas at World Horror Con here in Portland. We were both on a panel where we got to talk about Erotica in Horror (panel aptly named Smut, Gore, and More). Young, energetic, and a fellow cat person, I knew I had made a new friend. So let's meet this dude!

Tiffany Scandal: What inspired you to start writing Horror?

Lucas Mangum: The initial desire to write Horror was sparked in me when I was only six years old. It was Halloween, and my family sat down to watch Stephen King’s Silver Bullet. You know the werewolf movie where Gary Busey plays Corey Haim’s drunk-ass uncle? That’s the one. Pure 80s cheese, but not without genuine scares and character-driven tenderness. Well, I saw it and got scared to death. Slept with the lights on and everything, but the damnedest thing happened. On some deep level, I fucking liked feeling that way. When I learned that the movie was written by a man named Stephen King, it dawned on me that a writer was something people could be when they grew up.

 Writing horror dethroned space, sharks, and tractors to become my primary interest. I’d fold up a stack of paper, write a story in it (complete with my illustrations), and sell them to neighbors for a dollar a piece. I guess you could say I was pushing chapbooks long before I knew what the hell they were.

 Hmm… I suddenly feel compelled to write a story featuring space, sharks and tractors. Space Sharks vs Tractors? Sorry, this is my mind at 5:30 am.

 

TS: Your novel FLESH AND FIRE drops in August. Care to tell us about it?

 LM: FLESH AND FIRE is a story about a man in the midst of a midlife crisis who accidentally conjures his long-dead lover, Chloe, by playing an old song he wrote, and has to help her escape Hell. My starting point was asking myself the question, “What if Clive Barker wrote a paranormal romance?” and just kind of ran with it from there. Don’t get me wrong, it’s still very much a horror novel. The villain, Samael is one mean bastard who’s been in Hell so long he’s started to enjoy himself, and he wreaks all kinds of carnage.

 I also tried to mess with a lot of pre-existing themes in the subgenre. Like, instead of just having Todd, my main character, rescue Chloe, she also has to rescue him. They’re both in Hell, after all, even if hers is a lot more literal.

 It comes out on August 14th as part of Journalstone’s Double Down Series, packaged with a new one from Jonathan Maberry.

 

TS: Who and/or what are some of your influences?

LM: Oh, wow, so many! The aforementioned King and Barker, but I guess that’s every horror writer of the last generation. Poppy Z. Brite’s Drawing Blood and Sara Gran’s Come Closer were huge touchstones for me (the former showed me horror could be sexy; the latter is the scariest book I’ve ever read).

 Also, I have to recognize Brian Keene (for his industry commentary just as much as for his novels), Jonathan Maberry (who has been a great mentor and even better friend), and Shane McKenzie (who constantly inspires me to push boundaries and reminds me that, above all, this writing stuff is FUN).

 Lastly, all you crazy bizarro kids have been a great influence as well. I recommend writers in any genre to read bizarro, because it’s helped me think about my own writing in a totally different of way.

 

TS: You also co-wrote the sci-fi/horror film Epigenesis. What was your experience writing for film, and do you have any other film projects on the horizon?

LM: I co-wrote that with my friend Scout Tafoya and we shot it for something like fifty bucks. Scout describes it at Gus Van Sant’s My Private Idaho with an alien, but I promise it’s not that pretentious.

 Movies were my first love. For a while, in high school and the first couple of years of college, I toyed with the idea of directing and screenwriting. Doing Epigenesis was a real dream come true. While it has yet to find distribution, I regret nothing. It was a blast. I may even novelize it one day.

 My current project on the film front is called “Tap, Tap, Tap.” It’s a short film in the vein of “Lights Out,” which you should totally see, if you haven’t already. I wrote the script and right now it’s just a matter of pulling our resources together and shooting the damn thing.

 

TS: What’s a novel that makes you angry because you wish you wrote it?

LM: Not exactly a novel, but Preacher. I tell people all the time I think it’s the best story ever told. It’s got great emotional arcs, antiheroes, bizarro-worthy weirdness, horror, and God’s the villain. How do you go wrong?

 

TS: If you could sit with any literary idol (living or dead) and chat with them over some beverage, who would it be and what would you ask them?

LM: I hate to give a cliché answer, but I wouldn’t feel right not answering with Stephen King. In this age of conventions, there’s a good chance us horror writers CAN have a drink with anyone we like, if we’re not an asshole or the wrong kind of weird. The exception would be someone like King, who’s pretty inaccessible.

 I understand he doesn’t drink, so I’d settle for coffee, spike mine with bourbon, and try my damnedest to ask him something he hasn’t already been asked before.

 

TS: Where can we check out some of your short stories?

LM: I started posting a lot of my stories (some reprints, others brand new) on my Patreon page: https://www.patreon.com/lucasmangum. For as little as a buck a month, you can get a story every other week. I also have a story in the Fall ’14 Issue of Blight Digest alongside Kealan Patrick Burke, Ed Kurtz, MP Johnson, John Boden, and Michael Bailey: http://www.amazon.com/Blight-Digest-Fall-2014-Kurtz-ebook/dp/B00O4B6FE6.

My most recent sale is probably the one I’m most proud of. It’s for the fourth volume of IDW’s V-Wars anthology. That comes out either later this year or sometime next year.

 

TS: I heard you’re working on a Dinosaur novel?

LM: Yes! It’s called EXTINCTION PEAK and it’s about dinosaurs that burst out of the ground in a California mountain town and start eating everybody. There’s a serial killer among the survivors and a weird paranormal twist. It’s really one of the most insane things I’ve ever written. The first draft is done, but I still have quite a bit of revising to do.

 

TS: Favorite cat meme?

LM: This

 

I’ve been trying to get my orange cat, Eva, to twerk ever since.

 

TS: YES!!! Now Lucas, any final words?

LM: Now pass the scotch, please.

 

 

There you have it. Lucas Mangum. Keep your eyes peeled on this one. Remember his book FLESH AND FIRE comes out August 14th.

 

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, photographer, and Suicide Girl living in Portland, Oregon. Her second book Jigsaw Youth is out now through Ladybox Books. She also really loves twerking cats.

Jigsaw Youth out NOW

Dahlings,

While sipping on my morning tea, I got the news that the delay on the release of the Ladybox Books was finally over. I nearly showered my laptop with caffeinated herbal goodness. Holy fuck. Yes!

So first, if you backed the Kickstarter that helped make this release possible and you ordered the King Shot Press shithead shirt, this is what it looks like:

Extra shirts have been ordered, so if you're interested in purchasing one, I'm sure those details will be made public soon.

Extra shirts have been ordered, so if you're interested in purchasing one, I'm sure those details will be made public soon.

Then:

BOOM.

BOOM.

Available in print format NOW. (Kindle version coming soon).

Vol. 1 Brooklyn had this to say about Jigsaw Youth:

"Visceral and unpredictable, this book is a narrative that’s distinctively told, with many a nod to punk rock incorporated into the larger work."

Check out the excerpt posted on their site HERE

 

The Great 2015 Indie Press Preview from Electric Literature said this:

"Tiffany Scandal’s first book, There’s No Happy Ending, was a sad, beautiful, wonderfully imagined apocalypse story. It was dark and grim and surreal. There is such a vivid attention to detail to her work that you can’t possibly see everything she’s put into it. She’s a puzzler, and Jigsaw Youth sounds like it will continue and build upon the puzzle. It is one of two books marking the debut of the all-female imprint of Broken River Books: Ladybox Books. No doubt, this book will have plenty of raw punk angst, rich details and memorable characters. I’m excited."

 

Another excerpt from Jigsaw Youth was posted on the Ladybox Books website. You can read that HERE

And fellow Ladybox author Rios de la Luz had this to say:

"Tiffany Scandal is a force of brutal talent."

 

And speaking of Rios, her first book The Pulse Between Dimensions and the Desert is out today as well. Every bit I've heard and read has been fucking amazing. She possesses a voice I've been waiting for. Raw, brutal, honest. Packs a punch and bite that leaves you screaming for more. Definitely keep an eye on her because this lady is going to move oceans.

You can get your own copy HERE

You can get your own copy HERE

That's it for now. Thanks for reading, being awesome, and helping people pursue their dreams.

Keep it creepy!

-Scandal

Girl In A Band

I just met Kim Gordon.

She recently came out with a memoir titled Girl In A Band. The book tells about her life as an artist, musician, wife, mother; details California in the 60s and 70s and New York in the 80s and 90s. Awesome read, for sure.

She came through Portland for her book tour. Excited to be in the same room as her and listen to her speak, I clutched my copy of Girl In A Band and the free tshirt I was given at the door.

"I like Portland. The sky is huge. It feels like a largely working class city. Feels like the end, I mean, the edge of America."

The man who was interviewing her was disappointing. Heavily focusing his questions on the filmmakers she knew and her relationship with Danny Elfman, I felt myself screaming on the inside ASK BETTER QUESTIONS. Kim is fierce. She's done a hell of a lot and paved the way for a lot of badass women. I was glad when someone in the audience asked her about advice for being a creative woman in a largely male-dominated field, and she responded, "Just fucking do it. And be better."

Anyway, she signed my book and told me she loved my green hair.


Meet Brian Auspice

Good morning, lovely creeps.

Let me introduce you to the final installment of this year's New Bizarro Author Series. Brian Auspice!

Tiffany Scandal: Brian, how's it going?

Brian Auspice: Very well. Thank you for asking.

TS: You're a part of this year's New Bizarro Author Series. How'd you come across bizarro? And how'd you find out about NBAS?

BA: I came across Bizarro some years ago through the website Duotrope, or maybe Ralan, back when Eraserhead had an application process to be considered for publication. If I remember correctly, this would’ve been circa 2008 or so. I applied and never heard anything back, which isn’t all too surprising. I was writing straight horror around that time and nothing I had produced would’ve been construed as irreal/surreal/Bizarro. Between then and 2011, I had a handful of short stories published in a variety of publications, mostly POD, all of which belonged to endeavors that eventually folded. Some of my pre-irreal/surreal/Bizarro fiction may still be out there in cyberspace somewhere. I don’t recall how, specifically, but in November 2011 I discovered a short story collection entitled “They Had Goat Heads” by D. Harlan Wilson. In the subsequent six months, I read that book from cover to cover ten times. Something about the themes, the methods, the style, the delivery – everything about it, really – struck a chord with me. I decided that Bizarro would be my genre. I started work on Deep Blue in May 2012. While writing the book, I began to shop around for potential publishers. I was already aware of Eraserhead Press, so when I looked them back up, I found that they had moved from an application process to the NBAS.

TS: Tell me about your book DEEP BLUE.

BA: DEEP BLUE is a short novella that takes place in the final days of a surreal city of color. The protagonist, John, who is vaguely aware of an impending cataclysm, spends what little time he has left searching for answers to fundamental philosophical mysteries. What is reality? What is life? The different sections of color in the city represent different aspects of the human condition. John ventures into all of them to face whatever he may find, including his own personal demons.

You can pick up your very own copy HERE. Available in Kindle and paperback formats.

You can pick up your very own copy HERE. Available in Kindle and paperback formats.


TS: What inspired the story?

BA: It’s very difficult to pinpoint a specific inspiration. As previously mentioned, “They Had Goat Heads” certainly prompted me to start writing in the genre of Bizarro, and I’m sure one could trace certain similarities between that book and mine in terms of style and language. To be honest, I just started typing the first chapter on my phone one night and the rest followed.


TS: NBAS is intended to be a huge learning experience for new authors. What do you hope to get out of this opportunity?

BA: I look forward to meeting new people and learning about the business side of writing. I think understanding the art of networking and promotion will also be beneficial.


TS: If this book could make it into the hands of anyone, past or present, who would it be and why?

BA: This might be an obvious and/or typical answer, but I’d definitely have to say H.P. Lovecraft. I had never considered becoming a writer until I encountered Lovecraft’s work almost a decade ago. Even though DEEP BLUE isn’t true horror, or Lovecraftian, I’d be interested to hear what he would have to say about it.

TS: Any final words?

BA: I greatly appreciate you giving me the opportunity to talk about my novella. I hope people enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. 01001010 01101111 01101000 01101110 00100000 01110011 01110101 01100011 01100011 01110101 01101101 01100010 01110011 00101110

 

There you have it, creeps. Brain Auspice from this year's New Bizarro Author Series. If you like any of what he had to say, check his book DEEP BLUE, which is out now. You can also check out his website: http://bauspice.wordpress.com

 

Keep it creepy!

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, photographer, and Suicide Girl living in Portland, Oregon. Her second book, JIGSAW YOUTH will be out March 11th through LadyBox Books.




Meet Scott Cole

Creeps --

Last time, I had the privilege of introducing you to Tom Lucas. Now, you get to meet Scott Cole. He is 1/3 of this year's New Bizarro Author Series, and here to kick your ass with his debut SuperGhost.

Tiffany Scandal: Scott, how's it going?

Scott Cole: Great! It's a new year, so I recently shed my moss and twig layer, and revealed my new 2015 peanut butter layer to the world. It's crunchy. I'm very excited.

TS: You're a part of this year's New Bizarro Author Series. How'd you come across bizarro? And how'd you find out about NBAS?

SC: Well, I've always been a fan of weird stuff.

I was into horror from a relatively young age (I remember seeing The Shining when I was 7 or 8, and previewing The Texas Chainsaw Massacre at age 9 because I wanted to watch it with friends at my 10th birthday party). Eventually I discovered things like Surrealist art, Monty Python's Flying Circus, films like Eraserhead, and so on, and something about the weirdness of these things really struck a chord inside me. And so from that point on, I was always seeking out the strange corners of all kinds of media (not that I ever gave up my love of the horror genre).

Knowing this, a friend of mine asked me at some point (in 2006 or 2007, I believe) if I was familiar with the term "bizarro fiction". I wasn't, so I looked it up online, and found Carlton Mellick III's website, and a few publishers like Eraserhead Press and Raw Dog Screaming Press. I fell in love immediately, ordered a bunch of books, and have been reading bizarro ever since.

I was aware of the NBAS pretty much from the start of it, and I think it's great way for a press like Eraserhead to introduce new writers and give them a year to sort of find their footing in the world of publishing.

Reading bizarro helped get me excited about writing again after a bit of a lull, and eventually I realized that the NBAS would be something to aim for. So, achievement unlocked!

TS: Tell me about your book SuperGhost.

SC: SuperGhost is the story of a mad scientist who is posing as a therapist for people who suffer from Phantom Limb Syndrome. In actuality, he has devised a way to steal their phantom limbs (which are literally the ghosts of their missing appendages), and then assemble them into a giant multi-limbed ghost-monster. And then, of course, the amputees must find a way to band together to defeat this monstrosity.

I sometimes describe it to people as Frankenstein meets Pacific Rim, but weirder. Others have compared aspects of it to Ghostbusters. There's some horror, some sci-fi, some humor, some social commentary. I think it's a lot of fun.

SuperGhost is available now on kindle and paperback .

SuperGhost is available now on kindle and paperback .

TS: What inspired the story?

SC: I can't really point to any one thing that necessarily inspired it from the start, at least not consciously. I'm struck with random story ideas, or at least images that eventually lead to story ideas, all the time. I keep a notebook of ideas, titles, phrases, images, and so on, which I'll go back to if I'm stuck for something to write about.

I'd had the idea of a mad scientist sticking phantom limbs together lurking in the back of my head for a while, but wasn't sure what to do with it. And I had an idea involving the Meatball from the second half of the book at some point too. But I never got around to writing either of them as stories.

This was also at a time when I was struggling to figure out how to write something a bit longer than my previous work. I always just considered myself a short story writer, with most of my work being about 2500 words or less. But I really wanted to get into the NBAS, and I knew I'd need to write a novella in order to do that.

Finally, something clicked, and I realized these two story ideas would work well together, and maybe I could expand the story and turn it into something novella-length. Of course, I was in a movie theater when I had this Eureka moment, and I spent the duration of the film with my mind racing.

Not long after that, I started the actual work of writing SuperGhost. And once I was into it, I realized that the idea of people overcoming disabilities or setbacks was a real inspiration. It was fun to combine a serious idea with some of my great genre loves, like mad scientist stories, Cronenbergian body horror, and Japanese kaiju movies, and create something new.

TS: NBAS is intended to be a huge learning experience for new authors. What do you hope to get out of this opportunity?

SC: If you think of the bizarro scene as a college, the NBAS is kind of like freshman year. It feels exciting and welcoming and validating, but at the same time, it's really just the beginning of something that will be both challenging and fun.

It's amazing to have a book out through Eraserhead, and it's a really nice thing that there are people who specifically look to the NBAS each year to find new writers. So we've got to take that ball and run with it.

The biggest thing about this whole experience is finding and making connections with readers, as well as other writers. Convincing someone to drop some of their hard-earned money on a book by someone they've never heard of is easier said than done. So I'll be doing my best to continue making those connections as time moves forward. I'll be doing some more giveaways this year, as well as other fun things to try to reel people into the wonderful world of bizarro fiction.

TS: If this book could make it into the hands of anyone, past or present, who would it be and why?

SC: Well, my ultimate goal is to reach everyone on the planet who can read. Seems feasible, right?

Short of that, I don't know. I could list every writer or filmmaker whose work I've enjoyed, but that would really stretch the length of this interview out to something pretty unreasonable. It's true, though. I'd like to get this book into the hands of as many people as possible.

But, narrowing it down... I would love to know what a 1950s Ray Bradbury thought of SuperGhost. Or the Monty Python guys. Or Takashi Miike.

TS: How can we stalk you online?

SC: Twitter (@13visions) and Facebook (/scottcole13) are best for announcements, musings, and random photos and posts about whatever day-to-day strangeness I encounter.

I've got a website too, because I'm fancy (www.13visions.com). I really neglected it for a while, but lately I've been trying to post there a little more often. Some of my art and graphic design work can be found there as well.

TS: Closing thoughts/statements?

SC: I'd just like to say thanks to you, Tiffany, for the interview, and thank you to anyone who picks up SuperGhost. (And triple-thanks to anyone who reviews it!) I hope you all enjoy the ride.

Oh, and don't forget to eat your vegetables.

 

There you have it, ghouls and gals. If you dug anything (or hell, everything) about this interview, mosey on over and snag yourself a copy of SuperGhost today. Available in both paperback and kindle editions.

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, and resident crazy cat person. Her second book, Jigsaw Youth, will be out on March 11th through Ladybox Books.

Meet Tom Lucas.

Creeps!

Have I got a treat for you. Let me introduce you to 1/3 of this year's New Bizarro Author Series. Meet Tom Lucas, the author of Pax Titanus.

Tiffany Scandal: Tom, how's it going?

Tom Lucas: It’s going. I’m actually feeling a little irritated at the moment. I just got back from the hardware store. APPARENTLY, the wood chipper I rented last weekend had some hair or bone matter or something stuck in the blades. I know I cleaned it out before I returned it but they were all in a tizzy about it. I had to convince them that they needed to stop asking stupid questions. Excuse me while I go wash up.

 TS: You're a part of this year's New Bizarro Author Series. How'd you come across bizarro? And how'd you find out about NBAS?

 TL: Ok, I’m back. Yes, I am an NBASer. I used to just be a BSer, so it’s one hell of an upgrade. I first learned about bizarro from my friend, horror writer Sidney Williams. I had recently self-published my novel Leather to the Corinthians and I had no idea what I had written (turns out it’s bizarro) AND I was looking for an audience (yeah, I know that’s backwards – classic Tom). He sent me the link to Bizarro Central (the book was later reviewed on the site). There I learned about the genre, the people in the community, and a little bit about the NBAS.

 How I ended up in the series actually came to be thanks to mighty Rose O’Keefe. I attended her Bizarro 101 workshop through LitReactor and she opened the door to pitches. I pitched three novellas based on the three stories I wrote in the class. Those were passed on to Spike Marlowe who then contacted me and requested a manuscript for Pax Titanus.

 And now, here we are. This year went by at Mach 5.

 TS: Tell me about your book PAX TITANUS.

 TL: It’s a tender tale of a four-armed, ten foot tall space gladiator who, in order to save his son from kidnappers, must fight in a brutal tournament. Titanus is an alien whose race has the ability to enlarge any body part. I’m sure you can guess where this is going.

 It’s a space opera, a comedy, a social commentary, and a lot of jokes involving genitalia. What’s not to love?

 TS: What inspired the story?

 TL: I’ve always wanted to write a version of Rocky, a story where the protagonist has a lot of heart, not so much in the brains department, and will most likely fail in his quest.  I love world building, especially weird worlds, so this was a chance to scratch both itches. I scratched so hard and deep that I broke the skin.

 TS: NBAS is intended to be a huge learning experience for new authors. What do you hope to get out of this opportunity?

 TL: Ok, I’ve been around for a while and I have participated in a number of writing circles, communities, and other collective egos. I always pull away because there is a certain underlying nastiness about them. Many are the nexus point for competitive, pretentious, and judgmental personalities. They also tend to be inclusive.

 The bizarro community is nothing like this. I have never experienced such a cooperative and supportive scene. The people are great, simply stellar. So, my biggest hope, now that I have found my spiritual tribe, is to become a welcome member. I’d like to live here indefinitely and I know it will take time to make friends and build trust. I’m down with that.

 As a writer, my hope is that people enjoy my stories and wish to read more.

 TS: If this book could make it into the hands of anyone, past or present, who would it be and why?

 I can’t settle for less than three individuals.

 First, Douglas Adams because he’s a massive influence.

 Second, Phillip K. Dick because he’s a massive inspiration (so maddeningly prolific).

 Lastly, Hulk Hogan because he’s a massive dick.

 Also, the whole wrestling/gladiator thing seems like a good fit.

 TS: How can we stalk you online?

 I am everywhere and I am all things. This is just a sample of where people can find me:

 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TomLucasAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ReadTomLucas

Blog 1: http://readtomlucas.com/

Blog 2: http://churchofthebigredj.com/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/readtomlucas

 Also, anyone who signs up for my mailing list gets a free, exclusive story: http://eepurl.com/3LQ4b

 TS: Thank you for taking some time to hang out and answer these questions. Any last words?

TL: Does anyone know how to get a bloodstain out of cashmere? I know what you’re thinking…this guy wears cashmere?

Hey, thanks for having me here. Readers, please check out Pax Titanus! If you dig the book, review it! Reviews are so important for indie authors!

Exclamation points!!!!

 

There you have it, creeps <3. Tom Lucas, author of Pax Titanus. Out now through Eraserhead Press. If you like what you read above, be sure to check out his book, available now in print and Kindle format.

Stay tuned for interviews with Scott Cole and Brian Auspice.

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, and coffee snob. Her first book, There's No Happy Ending, is out now through Eraserhead Press, and her second book, Jigsaw Youth, will be out in March through Ladybox Books.

Scandalous Adventures: Bizarro Con 2014

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

I've just returned from the most magical weekend ever: Bizarro Con 2014.

Hosted by the wonderful people at Eraserhead Press, Portland's very own publisher of bizarro fiction, this event takes place in the enchanting (and haunted) Edgefield Manor in Troutdale, Oregon.

Checked in Thursday afternoon. Immediately found dried blood and a dead fly in my room. There was also a strange ticking noise in the room, but it's all easy shit to ignore once you've had enough to drink and work your way to exhaustion. Anyway, nerves a little tingly. I had been looking forward to this event all year. Bizarro Con is such a fucking magical experience, I know that for the months to come, I'll start many of my sentences with, "and this one time at Bizarro Con . . ." Yes, Bizarro Con is my band camp. Let me fill you in on why.

Friendly, creative people EVERYWHERE. As soon as I walked into the Ad House to pick up my badge, I was instantly welcomed with smiles and hugs. Saying hello and catching up with friends I hadn't seen since last year, meeting people I had become acquainted with online because of our mutual love for books and weird shit. It took me almost an hour to circle the first floor -- and this was just with saying hi to people. 

Opening ceremonies commenced. Rose O'Keefe, publisher for Eraserhead Press, gave a wonderful speech about Eraserhead Press celebrating 15 fabulous years of being in business. She shared its start, growth, and goals for the future. This was the seventh annual Bizarro Con, and considering everyone in attendance, it's very promising that this gathering will only grow larger with each coming year. As much as I love the intimacy of the gathering, it is pretty fucking exciting to see a community of creative people grow. Now if only Edgefield would also grow to accommodate the awesome parties that'll be hosted in the years to come. 

So thursday night is usually mellow. People are slowly trickling in, so there's a lot of hanging out at bars, wandering the halls, catching up with whoever you can because once the weekend gets going, it goes by fast.

Friday morning. 8 am. Writer's workshop with Cody Goodfellow. I take a little hair of the dog and start my morning with a screwdriver and a bagel. The focus of this workshop is how to build better worlds and plots for stories. Implementing the infamous John Skipp's notecard method, we jotted down our basic outlines from the prompt we were given. Once we lay the cards down, we start filling in gaps, making our stories grow. The exercise was a lot of fun, and I got to sit next to great dudes like Vince Kramer (author of Gigantic Death Worm and Death Machines Of Death), Ross E. Lockhart (author of Chick Bassist and publisher at Word Horde), and Gabino Iglesias (author of Gutmouth and the forthcoming novel Zero Saints)

Vince Kramer next to his outline and alien life form made from grapes and googly eyes.

Vince Kramer next to his outline and alien life form made from grapes and googly eyes.

Photo snagged from Gabino Iglesias.

Photo snagged from Gabino Iglesias.

After the workshop, I ran to my room to practice for my reading. An hour of second guessing my selection and making sure I don't go over my allotted time, I finally just threw in the towel and said, "fuck it." Read or die, and I fucking read. By a FIRE.

Smiling and taking a power stance as I read to a living room full of people about a woman who has to mutilate her own leg in order to escape a crumbling building. I'm pretty sure I don't always smile when I read about morbid shit. Photo by punk rock artist Chrissy Horchheimer.

Smiling and taking a power stance as I read to a living room full of people about a woman who has to mutilate her own leg in order to escape a crumbling building. I'm pretty sure I don't always smile when I read about morbid shit. Photo by punk rock artist Chrissy Horchheimer.

Cut to watching more readings, soaking in a heated pool with my boo, and preparing for a fantastic friday night party with some fucking brilliant live performances scheduled. 

This year's Wonderland Award Winner for Best Novel Of The Year, Brian Allen Carr reading from his latest THE LAST HORROR NOVEL IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD.

This year's Wonderland Award Winner for Best Novel Of The Year, Brian Allen Carr reading from his latest THE LAST HORROR NOVEL IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD.

MP Johnson reading from his latest release DUNGEONS AND DRAGQUEENS.

MP Johnson reading from his latest release DUNGEONS AND DRAGQUEENS.

Violet LeVoit reading from her latest release I'LL FUCK ANYTHING THAT MOVES AND STEPHEN HAWKING.

Violet LeVoit reading from her latest release I'LL FUCK ANYTHING THAT MOVES AND STEPHEN HAWKING.

Every performance was ace. There were good brews made with love from Rose O'Keefe and Jason Rizos. There were babes:

And weirdos:

And punkrock dragqueens:

Saturday was the day where you needed to have multiples of you. So many kick ass panels and readings happening at the same time. Running between buildings on ice-covered concrete isn't as fun as sounds when you're pressed for time and are constantly carrying shit in your hands. but you make do because you want to absorb as much of this experience as you can.

Saturday night is also host to the most fantastic awards ceremony and banquet, and also entertains you with the always wild Ultimate Bizarro Showdown. Great food, good people, and tons of laughs and people go up on stage and try to find the the best way to tell you the funniest and strangest story that they can. This year's winner:

Karl Fischer read a poem about a blackbird into a microphone placed in the fly of Broken River Books publisher J David Osborne's pants. There were head rubs and wonderful moments of intimate eye contact during the reading.

Karl Fischer read a poem about a blackbird into a microphone placed in the fly of Broken River Books publisher J David Osborne's pants. There were head rubs and wonderful moments of intimate eye contact during the reading.

Sunday was filled with food, trying to not feel like utter garbage because of all that you drank and how little you slept, and catching even more great panels. I even got to moderate one myself on the writing process and had the honor of sharing the table with John Skipp (author, screenwriter, film director, songwriter, publisher at Fungasm Press, and probably a million other awesome things), Laura Lee Bahr (author of Haunt, playwright, and actress), and Carlton Mellick III (godfather of the bizarro movement and author of 43 books). 

Sunday also included a bizarro wine tasting excursion hosted by Kevin L Donihe (who will tell you that wine is made from rocks that come from rivers of sadness and to not pair them with anything poisonous) and an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session in the soaking pool with Rose O'Keefe and Carlton Mellick III. A wonderful wrap-up to a magical weekend. I'm already counting down the days to the next Bizarro Con.

Now, I'm back at home and curled up with my cats. The strange ticking sound from the hotel room seems to have followed me back, but fuck it, don't ghosts make life more interesting anyway?

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal with a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, and contributor to the literary game-changer Ladybox Box Set. Her first book, There's No Happy Ending, is out now through Eraserhead Press, and her second book, Jigsaw Youth, will be out in March through Ladybox Books.

Scandalous Adventures: Be In Violet LeVoit's Dream Party

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I am a good-for-nothing broad.

Last night, I was invited to partake in a dream party hosted by an author I really admire: Violet LeVoit. Dream party? Yeah, you read that correctly.

So first, LeVoit is the author of I Am Genghis Cum, a pretty fantastic collection of stories dealing with some pretty intense body horror (disgruntled/desperate mothers having their babies turned into handbags . . . and it's a cool trend? Hell yeah!). She is also the author of the forthcoming I'll Fuck Anything That Moves And Stephen Hawking. In short, she is fucking fantastic.

Last night, she hosted the second annual "Be In Violet's Dream Party." The rules were simple, the host, before falling asleep will think about all of their friends and the fun that they will have. The guests, before falling asleep, have to snuggle with the intentions of being in LeVoit's dream. I had never done anything like this before, so I shrugged my shoulders and thought "why not?" I put on my Stay Puft pjs, chugged a glass of water to compensate for all of the coffee I consumed that day, and said, "I will be in Violet's dream" before turning off the light and closing my eyes.

Shit got weird. First, I was traveling in a car to get to an event. It was dark, and I think I was in some small town in Washington. Overweight rednecks with missing teeth were protesting inside of a Walgreens (where I stopped to get some snacks for the road), saying shit like how we need to keep food American. Racist signs were getting plastered on walls, and I remember feeling so angry, that I walked by and ripped down every sign they taped up and walked out the store. The car was missing, so I'm wandering the streets of this dark town and realize that I'm being followed/stalked by weapon carrying townspeople. 

At this point, my boyfriend and my cat wake me up. Forming a spooning centipede, I close my eyes and think, "Violet's dream now, please."

Everything is bright, I show up at what I think is a hotel. A woman dressed in fur and pearls is arguing with the desk about her status and seemed unable to wrap her head around her denied access. I had a suitcase in hand, looked to the desk, and got the smile and nod to proceed to the gated area where a security code was needed to enter. The guard at the gate smiles, enters the code, and I board onto the escalator that scales up toward the ceiling of an unfinished building. Blue sky with white puffy clouds hovering above everything. This was to be the largest mall in the world, and people could live there. I was lost. Wandering with my suitcase and not sure where I was headed. I get to the top floor and find out that a roller coaster and travels through water takes people to their rooms. How any of that makes sense, I have no fucking clue. But I was at the top floor of this mall, facing a roller coaster that came through the bottom of a pool. The roller coaster was stuck, and people were being told they had to dive into the pool and go through the opening at the bottom to access rooms. So I dove. As soon as I jumped in, I found myself standing in what looked like an airport terminal. I looked up and saw that the pool was an illusion. A thin film that looked liked water hovered above me. The roller coster, filled with smiling faces and dangling legs, to my left. Weird.

I'm supposed to be getting to this party. The door at the end of the walkway looks promising.

It led me into a dark school. A few people are gathered around a desk. A single lamp is lighting the room. A man walks over to me, adjusts his glasses and whispers, "don't go outside." Curious, he leads me to the window. We're on the third level of a boring brown building with windows forming horizontal stripes. Ground level, there was massive battle going on. Claymation deadites and people fighting to the death. Clay blood geysering everywhere. It basically looked like this video:

 except imagine a large battlefield, and people instead of cats. And. AND. Violet LeVoit leading the army against the deadites. From the third story, I saw her running, chainsaw held high, toward the large clay face bulging out of a pool. What a badass. I wanted to be down there. I wanted to fight by LeVoit's side. But got distracted the cafeteria where I found a tray full of pancake strips. Mmmm. Pancake strips.

Overall, this was a pretty fun exercise. Checking in on the facebook event page, it didn't look like my dream matched up with anyone else's, but the common consensus was that we all dreamt of large crowds in one way or another and recognized maybe only a handful of people. In my case, LeVoit was the only familiar face in my dreams.

This would be something that I would be open to trying again, but maybe with a small group. 

Alright. Now to drink more coffee and watch the crazy wind fuck shit up outside.

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and a contributor to the literary game-changer Ladybox Box Set. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Horror Babe Of The Week: Vulvatron

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

Today, I want to jump on the news bandwagon and talk about a total babe that is catching everyone's eye right now: VULVATRON. I just love saying that. Vulvatron. 

Vulvatron can sing, scream, and will lactate blood on you if you get close enough. Ladies and germs, say hello to one of the newest additions to Gwar: Vulvatron.

You thought I was joking about the bleeding titties?

You thought I was joking about the bleeding titties?

Outside of Gwar, Vulvatron goes by the name Kim Dylla. And Kim Dylla is just as much of a badass. She designs clothes that are influenced by Mad Max and bands likes Motley Crue and Guns N' Roses. She primarily works with salvaged leather and denim that she then destroys with bleach, paint, and/or studs. She also sang for bands like Kung Fu Dykes and This Means You (which you can check out on Spotify).

Here is a video about her clothing designs:

And here's a video of her performing with This Means You:

And here are more photos of her as Vulvatron. 

Okay. I've actually been trying to upload more pictures during this last half hour, but I think this blog is already experiencing babe overload. 

For you die hard Gwar fans out there, I know the struggle with seeing Dave Brockie (RIP) replaced so quick, but Vulvatron and Blothar seem pretty rad. Check them out on tour now. (Click me for tour dates). Bands they are performing with include Decapitated, American Sharks, and Corrosion of Conformity.

So there you have it. This week's Horror Babe. Vulvatron. Me-ow!


Keep it creepy!

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and is still obsessed with chocolate covered gummy bears. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Horror Babe Of The Week: Elvira

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad. 

If the title of this blog didn't spoil anything, the person I'm about to speak of should be no stranger to you. Get cozy in that chair, crack open your favorite beverage, and let's talk about the one and only Elvira. Me-ow.

Elvira got her start when she took over for Larry Vincent (AKA Sinister Seymour) on Los Angeles' KHJ-TV Fright Night in 1981. Upon her arrival, the show was renamed Movie Macabre. She had originally pitched the idea of looking like Sharon Tate in The Fearless Vampire Killers, but when producers turned down the idea, that's when the iconic sexy punk/vamp look was born. Plus, camp, cleavage, and a cleaver, quick-wit, Elvira was an instant favorite. 

A popular brand name in any horror aficionados home aside, I'm stoked to be bringing you this blog, on this day, for two reason:

1) It's her birthday

This babe is 63 and still very much a total fox.

This babe is 63 and still very much a total fox.

2) Tonight, A&E aired a very special episode of Epic Ink where not only does Elvira make an appearance and get her first tattoo, but she appears alongside awesome staff from Living Dead Magazine. How fucking cool is that?! Here are some pictures I snagged from Editor-in-Chief Deanna Uutela:

Editor-in-Chief of Living Dead Magazine getting Elvira's portrait tattooed on her arm.

Editor-in-Chief of Living Dead Magazine getting Elvira's portrait tattooed on her arm.

And the finished product.

And the finished product.

Awesome little facts about her:

-She's a vegetarian

-She briefly dated Elvis Presley when she was 17.

-She briefly lived in Italy to sing for a couple of rock bands.

-She used to be a go-go dancer at a gay bar. 

-She claimed to have lost her virginity to Tom Jones, which resulted in her needing to get stitches because of his ginormous wang.


There you have it, ghouls and gals. Horror babe of the week.


Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and ______________. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Interview: Atriarch

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad. 

I'm really fucking excited to introduce you to my friend Brooks Blackhawk, the guitarist for death rock band Atriarch. Okay, death rock is too constrictive here. Atriarch is an experience. Taking elements from doom metal, black metal, death rock, and more, Atriarch's music takes you on a journey that feels, well, spiritual. I'm not a religious person, but fuck, this music made me feel different. In a good way. Reminiscent of The Birthday Party and Bauhaus, only a million times heavier, Atriarch is a force to be reckoned with. So without further ado, join Brooks and myself as we talk about their new album, being signed on to Relapse Records, and general badassery.

TS: Hey, Brooks. First off, congratulations on signing with Relapse Records. How does it feel to be on the label that Alternative Press called "The Justice League of Extreme Metal"?

BB: Relapse have been supportive, forward thinking and absolutely stoked from long before the pen hit the paper. We feel like this has been an ideal paring. Incredibly stoked to be working with them.

 

TS: So Relapse will be releasing your third full-length album "An Unending Pathway." How do you feel the content on this album differs from your earlier work?

BB: Every album has been an evolution, a continuation of concepts. Birth, death, rebirth, enlightenment, pain, loss, hope and ultimately our personal esoteric spirituality which we hope to share. This is just another stone on the path before us as the fog clears and the veil lifts.

TS: You got to record with Billy Anderson (Swans, Sleep, Eyehategod). What was that like?

BB: Absolutely incredible beyond words. We have only worked with engineers in the past and to have a producer bring our vision to a new light and clarity has been that next level we needed to take things to. Beyond that, Billy is just one of the most positive and awesome dudes I know. It's impossible to take yourself too seriously with him around hahaha.

 

TS: Artirarch's music not only provides excellent aural stimulation, but it's almost a spiritual experience . . . especially if you listen in the dark. What are major influences for your work?

BB: That is exactly our intention. A transference of darkness to light. Sonic alchemy. When inner darkness is shared and converted to sound, brought out into the world for people to hear, a bond occurs between sender and receiver. That bond produces a joy and a happiness in knowing that darkness and pain and loss and sorrow is shared. A communion of souls.

 

TS: The album drops on October 28th. Any shows on the horizon to promote it?

BB: We will be touring the west coast this November, but the spring shall offer much broader horizons.

TS: Awesome! Looking forward to witness what the future has in store for you guys.

 

Thank you Brooks for taking the time to answer my questions. If this interview has piqued your interest, feel free to stalk the band through the following venues:

Facebook

SoundCloud

Official Website

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and total perv. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

 

LDM Horror Babe Of The Week: Chelsea Wolfe

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

Apologies to those who actively follow this blog and noticed a delay. I'm still kind of working on a real nice "Fuck You Very Much" card to the uninsured driver who hit and ran on me while I was on my way to work late last week. Despite the aches and pains and damage to my vespa, nothing would bring more pleasure than to talk about a talented babe to awesome people who love horror. This week's Horror Babe is Chelsea Wolfe.

If you don't know who Chelsea Wolfe is, then you, dear reader, are missing out. I first learned of Ms Wolfe by seeing this awesome fucking tshirt on a clothing designer I admire on instagram. It was a vintage-looking tshirt with raw edges and a massive fucking ouroboros with the words "Chelsea Wolfe" on it. Curious, because the shirt was so goddamn cool, I did a google search and found out that she's this fucking awesome musician. The first song I listened to was "Flatlands," and my ears have been having orgasms to her music since. 

To celebrate the year-anniversary of Pain Is Beauty, the video for "Kings" was released. Enjoy.

Now, as you might've noticed, these music videos are fucking beautiful. Stills that look like they could be from a favorite horror movie. Don't get that from the above video? Okay, weirdo. Then check out this one (which also happens to be the track on the Game Of Thrones trailer for season 4):

Chelsea Wolfe "Feral Love" official video, from the album "Pain Is Beauty". This piece is an excerpt from the long format film "Lone", out now.

It's been fun to see how her music has transformed over the years. Her first album "The Grime And The Glow" has a dark folk type feel. The recordings are gritty, that even while listening to their digital formats, it feels like you're listening to an old vinyl record. The "Vices And Advices" single emerged from this album wherein she covered You Are My Sunshine. It's easily the creepiest rendition of that song in existence. Okay, maybe in existence is a stretch, but this version is fucking eerie and beautiful. Sploosh.

After that, she released "Apokalypsis." That album takes on a slower pace (with the exception of a couple of songs) that, well, makes really awesome stripping music. Songs like Tracks (Tall Bodies) and Moses are songs I'm constantly trying to be sexy to when I listen to them (actual sexiness cannot be determined because my only audience has been . . . cats. And they pretty much don't give a shit about anything except food, treats, and the annihilation of toy mice). "Unknown Rooms: A Collection Of Acoustic Songs" followed, and that album is fucking beautiful. I'm a sucker for acoustic shit, and with her haunting voice, these tracks just give me goosebumps. I have this one on vinyl, and goddamn, I can listen to it for days.

Not from Unknown Rooms, but still remarkable acoustic stuff.

Her latest album "Pain Is Beauty" was released a year ago yesterday. At first, I was a little put off some of the electronic beats, but the album quickly grew on me and shortly after became the only thing I listened to for months. Did I say months? I meant to say the whole year it's been out. Not kidding. When I draw a blank on what to listen to, that album comes on. I listen to it when I'm writing, cleaning, reading, getting naked/dressed, taking a bath, drinking whiskey. Hell, I'm even listening to it right now. It's fucking magical. And to celebrate its first birthday, Ms Wolfe released the video for Kings (see video #1 toward the top). She is also having a sale on her website where everything, including vinyl, is 15% off (with a special code she's been posting on her social networking sites. Sale ends 9/6/14).

Anyway, she's elegant, graceful, and fierce -- unlike that "anyway" transition I just used to open this paragraph. Lyrics and voice to haunt you. Image to captivate you. Live, she is like a swan. Slow, alluring. You find yourself staring from across the room, mesmerized. In photos, something about her just pops and resonates. In trying to find what images I wanted to share with you wall, I found myself wanting to upload every single one. I won't do that because if you're interested, you can do the google image search yourself. But in the meanwhile, check this babe out:

Oh, and if that weren't enough for you. Check this out:

Yeah, look at how short I am compared to her. This was snapped after a show here in Portland. One of the best concerts I've been to a long while.

Alright ghouls and gals, there you have it. Horror babe of the week. Chelsea Wolfe. You're welcome.

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and air hockey champion. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 




LDM Scandalous Adventures

Hey. I'm Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

So my little black heart tingles and aches to share this news, but one of my all-time favorite bands is having a brief reunion . . . this fucking weekend. 

Schoolyard Heroes are back from the grave to play Bumbershoot. Disbanded in 2009, they are back five years later to kill it on stage for Seattle's premier Arts and Music festival. Rumor has it that there might be a secret show in Seattle as well, but I wasn't able to confirm the details on that. Curses.

It's been fun to follow this band and its members over the years. During their hiatus, they all went on to pursue other endeavors. From solo projects to playing/starting other bands, it's been exciting to see these incredibly talented people not just disappear. 

I had the honor of being invited to photograph their last show back in 2009 at El Corazon in Seattle. Running on four hours of sleep over the last 60 hours, I grabbed my camera and my favorite lady, and we made the drive from Portland to Seattle. 

That night was intense.

The venue was packed. Bodies pressed up against each other so tight, you'd think we were sardines. We finally squeezed our way through to the photographer's den, caught our breath, and made sure we didn't lose anything in the process of osmosis through the sea of sweating bodies. 

And the show was amazing. There was so much heart, happiness, and sadness. This show had an impact on me and I thought, "this is how you fucking do it." 

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

Photo courtesy of Erica Danger at dddanger.com

At one point, Ryann helped a lady up on stage. They sat there, facing one another, while Ryann sang to her. And they both started crying. Right on stage. It was a beautiful fucking moment that still sends chills down my spine.

Anyway, I was heartbroken to see them split, but still continued to listen to them often. And now, five years later, they're back. For those of you who have tickets, please do yourself a favor and check out this band. Raw energy, badass lyrics, amazing musical talent. They are slotted to perform on Sunday at 530 pm. Don't miss this.

 

Keep it creepy.

-Tiffany


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and is currently obsessed with reading Y: The Last Man. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Horror Babe Of The Week: (just read this one)

Hey. I'm Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

For Babe Of The Week, I've brought you talented, badass ladies. And I even brought you a dude. But today, today I'm going to do something different. I'm going to bring you . . . 

No, not that babe.

This babe:

Elvira's 1958 Ford Thunderbird. Me-ow! Customized by George Barris, the vehicle is also known as the Macrabre Mobile. And like our beloved Elvira, this vehicle is truly one of kind (for the sake of this blog, we'll just forget about the "knockoff" being showcased in the Peterson Automotive museum . . . which is still a custom vehicle by Barris). Anyway! 1958 Ford Thunderbird is a head-turner. With a custom spider-web grille, bat wing nose emblem, eyeball fenders, skull and cross bone hubcaps, leopard print upholstery, skeleton hands on the hood, chain link steering wheel with a skull in the center, AND a metal hood ornament depicting her as a crouched, winged banshee. Oh, and this car was originally a hardtop. When Elvira stated she wanted a convertible, Barris and his crew took chainsaws to the top, and viola! Convertible. How fucking cool is that?!

Ugh. This car screams sex.

Far from gas efficient (the Thunderbird clocks in at roughly 11 mpg), this is a total weekend (and local) driver. It's what you casually roll down your driveway in as you flip your neighbors the bird for leading such boring lives. It's what you drive when you're mad at your boss, boyfriend, girlfriend, or all of the above, and need to remind yourself that you are hot shit. It's what you drive in your mind because the chances of you actually driving this car are pretty fucking slim (but hey, the dreaming part is nice, right?).

Random fact: did you know that Elvira (well, Cassandra Peterson) originally wanted to be a race car driver? Scha-wing! A beautiful woman in control of a car with that much power? Please excuse me while I go change my underwear. Sploosh.

Keep it creepy!

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and really wants a ride in the Macabre Mobile. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Scandalous Adventures

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad. Let's go on a fucking adventure.

I had just gotten on the bus with my lover when my phone vibrated in my pocket. Looking at the screen, I immediately alerted the bus driver that I needed to be let off at the next stop. My lover was confused, but at this point in our relationship, he's accustomed to my rapid shifts (bless that poor man). Anyway, we got off the bus and I ran back home to get my camera. Photography is something that I dabble with from time to time, and this time, I was invited to tag along with the crew of Living Dead Magazine to watch and photograph the Black Lodge Burlesque. Being a huge fan of David Lynch/Twin Peaks, I couldn't say no. 

Camera in tow, we headed back downtown. With a few hours to kill before meeting up with Deanna and ZeeGee, the lover and I went to get sushi that wouldn't taste like demon foreskin. It's our favorite place in Portland. Small, quaint, cheap, and fucking delicious. We stacked our plates, ate until we were about to burst, and left having only spent $25 (including tip). Sushi Ichiban, I want to have your sushi babies.

Ran to Powell's for a quick second to see if a certain Steve Erickson book was in stock (it was), and then ran to a nearby gay bar to meet up with the lovely ladies of Living Dead Magazine for a few drinks before the show. At some point, the lover returned home because he has crazy deadlines.

Onward!

The Star Theater is in that part of downtown where they're really trying to gentrify it to be more like the Pearl District. Businesses I used to love and frequent are now vacant lots or abandoned buildings because rent got too high. Condominiums and coffee shops that reek of pretentious assholes popping up left and right. Non profit organizations catering to the needs of people experiencing homelessness becoming less visible next the shine of new, energy-efficient buildings catering to the wants of over-priviledged, yoga-subscribing, gluten-free, bmw-driving wankers, err, yuppies, err, uh, people. Now I'm straying from the point . . .

The Star Theater is lovely establishment in downtown portland. Old-fashioned marquis out front, seedy exterior that leads to a dark, elegant interior that kind of makes me think of a vampire sex club. Exposed brick and pipes, red velvet drapes, and dim lighting to make everyone look impeccable and eerie at the same time. 

The show itself was fucking amazing. As much as I'd love to, I'm not going to go into too much detail because Deanna, the lovely Editor-in-Chief, plans on writing a review about the show in October's issue of Living Dead Magazine. I will say though that every role was spot on, comedic timing was impeccable, and every performance was fucking fantastic. Dance numbers paying tribute to works like Dune, Blue Velvet, Lost Highway, Elephant Man, Eraserhead, Wild At Heart, and of course, Twin Peaks. A two-hour show packed with yuks, awesome costumes, babes, and tassel-flipping tittays. At $15, this show is a fucking steal and well-worth every penny.   Also snagged this gem, but did not follow the Log Lady's suggestion of framing just above the toilet. It's framed in my office between the two prints I snagged from the Twin Peaks Tribute Art Show that Floating World Comics had back in April. It adds a but of class, no?

Vera Mysteria is a total fox.

Vera Mysteria is a total fox.

After the show, we headed to Kelly's Olympian for more solid drinking . . . because Portland.

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and has a 14-page spread (as a model) and interview in the latest issue of Fuchsin Magazine. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press. 

LDM Interviews In The Dark With Tiffany Scandal

Hey. I'm Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad.

Every so often, I get to talking to cool people. Musicians, lingerie designers, authors, artists; rad people to remind me that life is fucking rad. So without further ado, here is the first of hopefully many interviews over the next few weeks.

My book, There's No Happy Endingwas published as part of a New Authors Series through Eraserhead Press. I was one of seven budding authors the press decided to take under its wing and show the ropes of what it takes to write, publish, and promote a book. Over our first year, we're asked to try to sell a certain number of books, network, and create a name for ourselves. Authors who excel in the graded categories could potentially be offered a contract with Eraserhead. A goddamn great learning experience, if you ask me. Anyway, I consider the other authors I was published with to be my bizarro brothers and sisters. So now that our first year as a published author is almost up, I figured I'd flash the proverbial bizarro bat signal so that we'd join forces and talk shop. The only author that couldn't make it out was Dustin Reade, but rumor has it, he's been pretty busy scouting badass golden girls for an army of Grambos.

 Anyway, to keep true to Scandal-fashion, copious amounts of liquor were provided and the lights have been turned off for a little game of get to know you . . . in the dark. Kinda creepy. Kinda sexy. Kinda . . . shit, let's just get on with this. Where's my whiskey?

The lights are off. What just happened?

A bit dark in here, isn't it? Hard to breathe. Smells like vinegar. That could be me. Let me just nudge myself into the corner, knock aside these spider webs. Ah, much better.

Oh, hey, Jamie.

JG: Hey, Tiffany!

So you wrote a book called The Mondo Vixen Massacre. Tell us a little about it.

JG: Okay, well, THE MONDO VIXEN MASSACRE is a Bizarro home invasion/revenge story, but it's also a love story about the choices and transformations an abused protagonist goes through in his violent journey to save the only woman he loves. Oh, yeah, I forgot about the rats, the snakes, green ooze, robots, and slow dancing.  

The Mondo Vixen Massacre is available now in print and kindle formats. You can get your own copy here.. Cover art by Matthew Revert.

The Mondo Vixen Massacre is available now in print and kindle formats. You can get your own copy here.. Cover art by Matthew Revert.

Bizarro is known for having shock-value quality. Almost like Troma meets David Lynch but in book format. Were there any scenes that, looking back, you’re still surprised were birthed from your imagination?

JG: Definitely. There's an intense juke joint scene. It spirals into absolute madness. I remember plugging into some jams and letting my fingers dance across the keys until my dancing just sort of started happening on its own. I think I had Grinderman's song Get It On looping for hours and that song is built on a weird loop, so every time it started over, it acted like a trigger for my fingers to keep pace with my mind. But, yeah, the juke joint scene rockets over-the-top, hog wild, goes to a stinky, dark, and gory place I didn't even know I had inside me. Or a place I didn't want to let out. But I did. I gave birth to a beast. And I'm glad I did, even if I had to wash my hands, shake off the goop, after writing it.

Bizarro is kind of a specific genre that still doesn’t have a huge audience (but we’re working to change that). How’d you come to know Bizarro and what made you want to write it?

JG: I came across Bizarro around 2011 or 2012 just clicking weird books on Amazon. Living in Beijing, I had no access to any kind of Bizarro scene, so I honed the power of the Internet to discover cool-looking books that called out to me. I was searching for books with a "cult movie" kind of feel and, luckily, I stumbled upon some Bizarro titles, some folks who had beat me to the punch. I kept digging and reading and was enjoying what I was reading. Having a Kindle helped things. Around that time, I was writing shorter pieces, but something about Bizarro fueled me to let loose on the page and tell a longer narrative I really wanted to tell without feeling pressured into one genre. All of this resulted in my NBAS title. As you can imagine, I was overjoyed when THE MONDO VIXEN MASSACRE was picked up by Eraserhead.

What has your experience with NBAS been like so far? Any advice you have for writers just starting out? What projects are you working on now? What do you have lined up for the future?

JG: NBAS has been a wild and fruitful ride, the kind of experience that will stick with me for the rest of my life. It's great, because you get to communicate closely with the other NBAS authors and you really do meet a lot of new folks in the Bizarro community and other genres, too. Working with Eraserhead Press has been superb and they really welcome you in, sharpen you up.

As for advice, I'd probably end up passing on poorly said misquotations of the wisdoms I've received from those who are much better at writing than I am. That said, I always try to out-write myself with each new project. I want to get better and keep getting better. Barreling through self-doubt is always an issue, but I write, because I love it and I feel the need to do so. If you work within the realm of necessity, you'll almost never let yourself down. As for the future, I do have some Bizarro and pulpy projects I'm carving up and try to work on two or three new things at a time. We'll see what makes the cut and what gets tossed to the burn barrel.

Speaking of which, do you mind if I flick this lighter on for a sec? You said it'd be dark, but I didn't think it would be this dark. Or, we can keep it like this. I can get used to these spiders. Thanks, Tiffany. 

Sure thing, Jamie!

During this time, a massive flame burst out of the lighter and exposed the biggest fucking spider I've ever seen in my life. Jamie, like a hero, waved the flame and scared the spider away. No spiders were harmed during the conduction of this interview. Also, the flame helped me find a spider-free whiskey. For more on Jamie Grefe, here is appropriate stalking information:

Website

Twitter

And don't forget his book The Mondo Vixen Massacre


Now with my whiskey in tow, I'm off to feel the . . . i mean, uh, feel for the next author. 

The lights are off. What just happened?

I'm not drunk, but I'm slightly high, so I hope that counts. ... It helps me sleep.

Oh, hey, Andy! Don't fall asleep just yet. I got a few questions to ask you. You wrote a book call The Cheat Code For God Mode. Tell us a little about it.

ADF: Margy and Victor are two geeky friends who love video games and happen to find one that controls their universe. Soon they find themselves being hunted and banished to the Old Internet where they learn a world-shattering truth.

The Cheat Code For God Mode is available now in print and kindle format now. Get your copy here.

The Cheat Code For God Mode is available now in print and kindle format now. Get your copy here.

Bizarro is known for having shock-value quality. Were there any scenes that, looking back, you’re still surprised were birthed from your imagination?

ADF: Cheat Code is pretty tame when it comes to some of the tropes found in bizarro. I even had to ask Bradley during the editing phase if this would be considered bizarro since it didn't have guts, gore, and sex. I do want to use what I learned in Shane's horror writing workshop for a future work, though.

How’d you come to know Bizarro and what made you want to write it?

ADF: Fellow bizarro author Michael Allen Rose and I have been pretty bizarre for about a decade now, and I was living vicariously through him and his BizarroCon experiences for several years. I had been writing fantasy, so bizarro was a nice transition. Just less fairies and dragons.

What has your experience with NBAS been like so far? Any advice you have for writers just starting out? 

Like MAR told me years ago, the bizarro family is one of the nicest, most helpful groups of people I will ever meet. It's been the best. And I guess my advice would be - get to know your fellow authors. You don't know everything, they can help.

What projects are you working on now? What do you have lined up for the future?

I'm still illustrating Shane McKenzie's Puppy Love. Drawing is time consuming, so it's taking a while. I have an experimental piece I'm putting together that I'm really excited about. It tells the story of this time-traveling geisha but through the eyes of people who meet her, and how they would record it. A lot of research, this one.

Well, thanks Andy! I'll let you get some sleep. For appropriate stalking information, you can follow Andy de Fonseca on Goodreads. And don't forget about her book The Cheat Code For God Mode.

Onward!

In the dark, I bumped into someone and just felt a massive beard.

Oh, hey, Daniel.

DV: Hey.

So you wrote a book called The Church Of TV As God. Tell us a little about it.

It’s about a guy named Jeremy, kind of an everyman, just some average slub. He’s a slacker. A guy who never lived up to his potential, maybe. Probably based off of myself. Or anyone really in their mid to late twenties, living a post-college life. Working a shitty job, a job he hates. The only thing special about him is that his head is turning into a TV. And he doesn’t really seem to care all that much about it. But, then again, he doesn’t care about much of anything, really. But his head is turning into a TV. He has no idea why. Just that it’s something that happens to all the men in his family. Like a hereditary disease or something. And then, all in a short amount of time, his life totally changes. First he catches the attention of a TV worshipping cult. Then he meets a totally badass talking dog named Benjamin, who invites himself into Jeremy’s life, whether Jeremy likes it or not. The cult (called The Church of TV as God) approaches Jeremy to tell him of his destiny. They think he is their savior. The one spoken of in their religious teachings. A man with a TV for a head that will bring about the second coming of The Great TV in the Sky. But Jeremy doesn’t want any part of that. And, as they say, hijinks ensue.

The Church Of TV As God is available now in print and kindle format. Get your copy here.

The Church Of TV As God is available now in print and kindle format. Get your copy here.

Were there any scenes in The Church Of TV As God that, looking back, you’re still surprised were birthed from your imagination?

I think maybe the end of the book. All the chaos there. It’s gross and it’s fucked up and it’s pretty dark. (I won’t go into detail about it though, for obvious reasons). But, as far as my book goes, I think it’s kind of tame when compared to other bizarro titles. I don’t know. Maybe it’s just because I wrote it. But I was actually hesitant to submit it for the NBAS because I didn’t think it was “bizarro” enough. I don’t know.

How’d you come to know Bizarro and what made you want to write it?

The first bizarro anything I ever read was issue 6 of Bust Down the Door and Eat All the Chickens. I found it at Quimby’s in Chicago. I read it. I loved it. And then I think I kind of forgot all about it for a while. I’d been seeing random bizarro books come up in my recommendations on amazon for a while. It was right around the time Cannibals of Candyland came out. I ordered that and War Slut and Extinction Journals and Angeldust Apocalypse. And the rest is kind of history. I’ve been a huge bizarro fan ever since. As far as writing bizarro goes: I don’t think I ever set out to write bizarro, not really. I think my writing had always been weird and out there and crazy. It’s just that upon discovering bizarro I now had a word for the kind of writing I was doing. In college I was reading a lot of Bret Easton Ellis and the like, and tried to write more serious/literary stuff, but I couldn’t do it. I just wanted to write about talking dinosaurs and bats made of bacon and trash monsters and stuff. Needless to say my writing was not well received in the writing workshops at my school. I got bummed out because of it too. I wanted to be a writer but I didn’t think anyone would ever want to read my shit. After I graduated I kind of stopped writing for about two years. And then I saw Garrett Cook posted on facebook about a bizarro workshop he was teaching. I took it and that was when I really devoted myself to writing bizarro.

What has your experience with NBAS been like so far? Any advice you have for writers just starting out?

This year has taught me a lot of stuff. One thing is that I’m pretty terrible at marketing myself and my writing. I don’t know how to do it. My marketing techniques extend to pretty much just posting BUY MY BOOK! WON’T YOU PLEASE BUY MY FUCKING BOOK ALREADY???? on facebook. Over and over and over again. It also taught me that there is more to being a writer than just writing. Which is kind of depressing, I think. The best advice I ever got (and this includes the four years of writing classes I took in college) is simply JUST FUCKING WRITE. Turn the TV off. Get off the damn internet. And fucking write.

Word. What projects are you working on now? What do you have lined up for the future?

I am working on a few things at the moment. I’m slowly writing what I hope will be my next book. The current working title is THE DEATH OF EVERYTHING and I’m calling it a junkyard bizarro noir story. And I just finished a collection of non-fiction vignettes called AMPHETAMINE PSYCHOSIS. I’m working on touching them up a bit and then I hope to shop it around. I’m also editing a lot of my poetry. I have hundreds and hundreds of poems. And I’m hoping to put together another chapbook. This one will probably be called POEMS!! 2!! (My first chapbooks was called POEMS!!).

Thanks, Daniel! To stalk him online, check out these links:

Tumblr

Website

Twitter

And don't forget about his book The Church Of TV As God

Moving on!

I heard beeping from a handheld gaming device in the distance. I trudged forward and found myself with Amanda Billings, the author of 8-Bit Apocalypse.

Hey, Amanda. Tell us a little about 8-Bit Apocalypse.

AB: Atari games have come to life and are hell-bent on destroying Denver. Jimmy Toledo, a former arcade prodigy turned Chuck E. Cheese slave, is the only man who can save the city. He just needs some help from Russian cat massage whisper videos to sooth the social anxiety that comes with saving civilians. You know, like most heroes. Centipede, Frogger, Donkey Kong and more come to life and smash apart the city while most Denver residents fight to post the best pics on Instagram. I’ve loved video games for as long as I can remember—the first system I had was a Commodore 64 and my favorite system is the TurboGrafx-16--so it was fun to play around with old school games in 8-BIT.

8-Bit Apocalypse is available now in print and Kindle format. Get your copy here

8-Bit Apocalypse is available now in print and Kindle format. Get your copy here

Bizarro is known for having shock-value quality.  Were there any scenes that, looking back, you’re still surprised were birthed from your imagination?

AB: Knowing myself, I’m not really surprised by anything that I came up with. One of my favorite scenes to write was a sex scene between a government agent who looks like R2-D2 and a Denver rando who thinks she’s about to die. Jimmy considers joining in for a threesome. I think it’s the first time I’ve used the word “chode” in my writing, so that’s a plus.

Bizarro is kind of a specific genre that still doesn’t have a huge audience (but we’re working to change that). How’d you come to know Bizarro and what made you want to write it?

AB: I wrote a weird story about game boards coming to life and interrupting a couple’s first date with their murderous rampage (I swear, I don’t just write about games killing people). I was Googling around to try and find a home for it when I stumbled across BUST DOWN THE DOOR AND EAT ALL THE CHICKENS. Bradley Sands published my piece and that was my first step into Bizarro. I’ve always loved the absurd, so it seems like a natural fit for me.

What has your experience with NBAS been like so far?

AB: I have learned so much through the NBAS process. The biggest thing I’ve discovered is what a loving, supportive community there is in the Bizarro world. The advice and feedback I’ve gotten from everyone in the Bizarro community, from my editor Bradley to other authors and former NBAS veterans, has been tremendously helpful.

Any advice you have for writers just starting out?

AB: Read everything you can and don’t be afraid to write what you love. I come from a very traditional writing background—I attended a pretty traditional MFA program and have spent most of my professional life surrounded by very talented literary fiction writers with clear definitions of what does and doesn’t have literary value. As a writer, I’ve always found tremendous importance in experimentation and play, even though it’s hard to keep those critical voices out of your head as you start to go down those paths.

What projects are you working on now?

AB: Bradley is putting together an anthology of walkthroughs for video games that don’t exists—fantastic idea, right?--so that’s the next project I’m looking forward to being part of.

What do you have lined up for the future?

AB: Right now I’m just trying to be happy. Does that sound like a lame answer? 

Not at all, Amanda. Thanks for answering these questions! Don't forget to check out her book 8-Bit Apocalypse.

With the lights still out, I fumbled my way through the dark room. I'm not sure if I'm stumbling at this point because of the whiskey or because my eyes are having a tough fucking time adjusting. Anyway, I have one person left to introduce you to. Ladies and germs, meet Bix Skahill.

BIX! You wrote a book called Babes In Gangland. Tell us a little about it.

BS: Babes in Gangland is an odd little book for odd little people.

Babes In Gangland is available now in print and kindle format. You can get your copy here

Babes In Gangland is available now in print and kindle format. You can get your copy here

Bizarro is known for having shock-value quality.  Were there any scenes that, looking back, you’re still surprised were birthed from your imagination?

BS: I'm always shocked when people are shocked by my book. There's nothing in it that seems terribly upsetting but people seem to think it is. I suppose having a swearing, sex-starved baby is shocking to some people. Not me. It's my life.

Bizarro is kind of a specific genre that still doesn’t have a huge audience (but we’re working to change that). How’d you come to know Bizarro and what made you want to write it?

BS: I found Bizarro (Which I call Bixarro) thanks to my friend Keith. I wrote a book in grad school and was desperately trying to get it published with regular, boring old publishers. They all rejected it and said it was too weird. Again, I didn't think it was that weird, but hey. Anyhoo, after my hundredth rejection notice, my friend Keith told me about Bizarro. I've been a fan ever since.

What has your experience with NBAS been like so far? Any advice you have for writers just starting out?

BS: What I like most about the NBAS (except seeing my book in print) is the other NBAS authors. It's been great getting to know them. As far as advice to new writers, write something that scares you, makes you creeped out a little, something that makes you laugh or be afraid to turn out the lights.

What projects are you working on now?

BS: I am working on a book called Dope Tits. I don't like talking about work before it hits the streets, so yeah, it's called Dope Tits. That's all I'll say. The title, which is Dope Tits. Okay, I'll tell you this much, it's about a young woman who has psychotropic tits. Therefore, the title. Dope Tits.

To learn more about Bixarro, you can lurk him through the following venues:

IMBD

Twitter

And don't forget about his book Babes in Gangland.

Alright ghouls and gals, hope you all enjoyed this game as much as I did. Keep it creepy.

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and wants to interview you (seriously, if you want to be harassed, let her know). Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press.

LDM: Horror Babe Of The Week: Debbie Rochon

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing-broad.

So I tried something different last week. I presented a dude (but a mighty fine one at that) as last week's Horror Babe, but I'm gonna bring it back. Because, who am I kidding? Boobs are awesome. This week, the title goes to Debbie Rochon.

Any self-respecting horror-fan should know her from her roles in Terror Firmer, Tromeo And Juliet, and loads of other awesome b-rated horror flicks. Also, she won "Scream Queen Of The Decade" award back in 2003 from Draculina Magazine. Resume check? Wow!

Blood, gore, and more, this babe delivers. It takes a special kind of woman to deliver the caliber of horror she brings, and, man, she leaves us wanting more.

She's strong, confident, and if it takes flashing tits to make a point, she'll do it and deliver your fears . . . yeah, she also won Best Female Psycho in a movie (AKA "Best Psychette") for her performance in American Nightmare.

Interesting facts about Rochon:

She made her career. Rough upbringing. Fled from foster care. Homelessness. Landed a roll as an extra in Ladies And Gentleman, The Fabulous Stains, and from there went on to save money to move to New York and make a name for herself. And what a name, indeed. Having starred in over 200 films (mostly horror), Rochon's name is not one to reckoned with. 

Check her out and admire. What a woman!

Keep it creepy!

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and likes boobs. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press.

LDM Scandalous Adventures

Hey. I'm Tiffany Scandal and I'm a good-for-nothing broad. Let's go on a fucking adventure.

Now, I have a confession to make. Originally this adventure blog was inspired by an upcoming trip I was about to embark on. I agreed to travel the country with Suicide Girls for the Uproar Tour. Being paid the travel with a bunch of babes sounds like a dream, right? Sadly, as it got closer to the date I was told I would leave and not hearing very much in the way of a confirmation, outlook of this adventure actually happening started to look grim. Finally two days after I would've had to give my day job notice that I was leaving, I was informed that we would no longer be a part of that tour. My heart sank a little, but I clapped my hands and shouted "plot twist!" Figured I take the all the extra time I have not leaving the city, actually exploring the city and writing about it. So welcome to my local adventures . . . unless if some of you actually want to send me somewhere to explore -- I'll take that option too. Just saying

Onward! 

It was my birthday on Saturday. I had already resigned myself to the notion that I would spend it indoors in the confines of a pillow fort, drink from a bottle of the cheapest wine I could find, and watch nothing but Absolutely Fabulous all day long. According to my friends, that was the incorrect answer. So I put on my best gothic Peggy Bundy outfit and prepared myself to paint the town red. 

Are you ready?

Are you ready?

First stop on our adventure was Church. The idea of saying, "I got wasted at Church" was kind of arousing, but when I heard that they had a photo booth that looked like a confessional booth  and that you could take pictures for free if you typed "boobs," my underwear was instantly wet and I had to go. 

The bar was a little smaller than I had envisioned, but for a Saturday night, was not as crowded as most bars I almost immediately regret stepping into on a weekend. There was a wood paneled wall to the left with super old-school-looking light fixtures. The outdoor walls were huge windows looking out to almost dead Sandy Blvd. The decor was a decent mashup of old wooden cathedral and urban living. On almost every wall, you'd read "Eat, Drink, Repent." 

Their whiskey gingers were pretty solid. Using a nice, spicy ginger beer in place of ginger ale is  an excellent touch. Drinks didn't taste like they had a heavy pour, but after about four, I found myself hyper aware of my surroundings (more on that later). Drinks to check out: Wolf I Am, Hang Your Cross, and Death From Above. 

The photo booth was a lot of fun. Walking toward the back corner of the bar, I saw an opening with a black curtain. Just above, a lit up sign that read "confessions." I would say the booth looked more like a wooden sauna than a confessional, but you could easily fit four people in there and take rad pictures. Didn't see where you could type in "boobs," but it was only $2.99 for a strip of photos that get sent via text to your smartphone. Not a bad deal at all. Here are some samples:

I just really wanted to smell his face. 

I just really wanted to smell his face. 

Pros about this bar: 

-decent decor

-awesome photo booth

-good food

-nice bartenders

-not as crowded as most bars on a saturday night (I'm guessing this is based on location. Not too many open places within foreseeable walking distance).

-awesome happy hour prices

Cons:

-The door guy. I get that IDs need to be checked when stepping into a bar, but there was a moment where I quickly poked my head outside to see if I could find an open table. I smiled at him as I stepped past, but didn't even go two feet from where he was standing, and the dude still stopped me at the door to check my ID. Shrug.

-Around midnight, it was like DoucheCon let out and the entire vibe of the bar changed. Despite feeling a little tipsy (but far from this), I was suddenly hyperaware of my surroundings. Bros and fake-tanned ladies wearing the tiniest bits of shiny fabric every step you take. I went to take some photos with friends, and in the time we were gone (the time it takes to take four photos in a photo booth), another group swooped in and took 3/4 of our table. Purses, jackets, and drinks were still on the table and chairs we temporarily moved away from. When we tried to let them know we were sitting there, they smiled and continued their conversation. I contemplated pulling the chair from under one of the ladies and starting a bar brawl, but figured I'd rather end my night on the comfort of my own bed and not some pee-soaked jail cell. There was also, a heavy abundance of cocaine usage here. I haven't seen so many coked out ladies since my Los Angeles/College days. It was, well, it's just not my bag. We retrieved our belongings from around the strangers and decided to head to a more comfortable environment.

Overall, I really like what Church could offer. But I wouldn't recommend going late at night. Check them out when just open and take advantage of the $3 well drinks they have to offer. The bar itself earns four out of five rotting skulls, but late-night clientele definitely drops it down to one. 

Alright ghouls and gals, is there a place in Portland you want to check out but haven't had the cajones to? Let me know, and maybe I'll head there next. 

Keep it creepy!

-Scandal


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and likes your face. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press.

LDM: Horror Babe Of The Week: Tairrie Murphy

Hey. My name is Tiffany Scandal and I am a good-for-nothing broad.

I am also a blasphemous girl, much like this week's Horror Babe Of The Week. Ladies and gents, I present to you Tairrie-motherfucking-B:

Me-ow

Me-ow

Formerly Miss B, now Mrs M. Some of you may know her as the front woman for metal band My Ruin. Some of you may even know about the rap career that preceded Manhole (later renamed Tura Satana), My Ruin, and the collaboration between her and her husband (Mick Murphy) LVRS. Regardless of creative expression, Tairrie fucking brings it. Total badass woman that commands attention.

"God wants a piece of my ass" - lyric from track Blasphemous Girl on Speak & Destroy.

"God wants a piece of my ass" - lyric from track Blasphemous Girl on Speak & Destroy.

Provocative lyrics challenging societal ideals, Mrs M gives no fucks and says it like it is. Screaming into a microphone about how we need to be proud of our bodies, how we need to stand up for ourselves, how to challenge everything. And she doesn't just scream. No. During live performances, she will get in your face, stare deep into your being, make you feel bashful as your pants either get tighter or stick in between your legs as her red lipstick stains the microphone in her hand. She'll turn, fall to the ground, claw at everything around her, and words will spill out of her like they were being exorcised. She's bold and daring and frightening -- the perfect woman.

Outside of live performances, the albums are great listens. Lyrics deliciously sacrilegious (sacrilicious), you can't help but want to belt along and chuckle when you see how many religious-right folks you offend in public.

At 49, Tairrie is still one of the hottest ladies around (yes, most of these are recent). My Ruin released an album (The Sacred Mood) in 2013 and are currently on a UK tour. 

I had the privilege of watching them perform a few times while I was still living in Los Angeles. One was for promotion of The Brutal Language, and the other was for A Prayer Under Pressure Of Violent Anguish (so basically, a million years ago . . . I'm such a terrible fan). Both times, the band was a total blast to watch. Lots of energy, rad audience that got really into the music, and the band hung after to show to meet whoever had the balls to talk to them. I was one such person, and they were all super fucking nice. Somewhere, there's a photo of Tairrie, Mick and myself, but that would involve a lot of digging through old photos only to find said photo and laugh at how I look like a turd throwing metal horns high up into the air. Anyway, just take my word for it. Rad people. Rad band. 

Check out their latest album, The Sacred Mood. Out now through Rovena Recordings. 

That wraps up this week's edition of Horror Babe Of The Week. Stay tuned for more blogs throughout the week.

 

Keep it creepy.

-Scandal

Oh, and Living Dead Magazine, this is one is for you (you're welcome) <3


Tiffany Scandal is a writer, Suicide Girl, photographer, intern at Living Dead Magazine, and whiskey aficionado. Her first book THERE'S NO HAPPY ENDING is out now through Eraserhead Press.



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